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13 December 2018

You are what you eat:...

11 December 2018

Bioenergy cropland expansion could be as bad for biodiversity as climate change...

22 November 2018

Mind the gap: Managing forests for multiple benefits...

30 October 2018

Giraffes: Equals Stick Together ...

22 October 2018

Gebirge bereiten Boden für Artenreichtum...

26 September 2018

New plants on the block ...

29 August 2018

A bucket full of genes: pond water reveals tropical frogs...

09 August 2018

Animals and plants jointly conduct their coexistence...

08 August 2018

Zehn Jahre Senckenberg Biodiversität und Klima Forschungszentrum ...

06 July 2018

Big eyes but diminished brain power: Night-time activity makes its mark on fish brains...

18 June 2018

Brood care gene steers the division of labour among ants...

18 May 2018

Asian tiger mosquito on the move...

03 May 2018

Mückenjagd auf dem Friedhof...

05 April 2018

The blue whale genome reveals the animals' extraordinary evolutionary history ...

21 March 2018

Abrupt Rise in Sea Level Delayed the Transition to Agriculture in Southeastern Europe ...

14 March 2018

Mountains become islands...

07 March 2018

Ant raids: It’s all in the genes...

01 March 2018

Alle Pilze sind schon da: Wenn Bäume den Berg hinauf wandern, warten ihre Pilzpartner bereits auf sie...

06 February 2018

Krank durch Frühjahrsputz?...

05 February 2018

Up to 16 % of Animal and Plant Species are Potential Emigrants...

25 January 2018

Mammals move less in human-modified landscapes ...

Press Releases

You are what you eat:

Frankfurt am Main, Germany, 12/13/2018. To eat what grows locally – today’s dietary trend was every day’s practice for prehistoric humans. Studying fossil tooth enamel, German researchers from the Senckenberg research institutes and Goethe University Frankfurt discovered that the early hominins Homo rudolfensis and the so-called Nutcracker Man, Paranthropus boisei, who both lived around 2.4 million years ago in Malawi, were surprisingly adaptable and changed their diet according to the availability of regional resources. Being this versatile contributed to their ability to thrive in different environments. The new findings from southeastern Africa close a significant gap in our knowledge, according to the researchers’ paper just published in the "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA".

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