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04 July 2019

Wo sich es sich wirklich lohnt, Regenwald zu renaturieren...

01 July 2019

Senckenberg-Ausgründung Phytoprove gewinnt 2. Preis bei Gründerwettbewerb ...

16 April 2019

Die Mehrheit der deutschen Bevölkerung sieht die Rückkehr der Wölfe positiv ...

28 March 2019

A double burden: Land use and climate jointly alter montane biodiversity and ecosystems...

27 March 2019

European farmlands are losing their insect-eating birds...

26 March 2019

The big picture about climate change emerges from looking at small bivalves...

06 March 2019

Neue exotische Mückenart siedelt sich in Hessen an...

05 March 2019

Weltweiter Handel bringt biologische Vielfalt in Bedrängnis...

Press Releases

You are what you eat:

Frankfurt am Main, Germany, 12/13/2018. To eat what grows locally – today’s dietary trend was every day’s practice for prehistoric humans. Studying fossil tooth enamel, German researchers from the Senckenberg research institutes and Goethe University Frankfurt discovered that the early hominins Homo rudolfensis and the so-called Nutcracker Man, Paranthropus boisei, who both lived around 2.4 million years ago in Malawi, were surprisingly adaptable and changed their diet according to the availability of regional resources. Being this versatile contributed to their ability to thrive in different environments. The new findings from southeastern Africa close a significant gap in our knowledge, according to the researchers’ paper just published in the "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA".

>>> Read on http://www.senckenberg.de/root/index.php?page_id=5210&kid=2&id=4969